TV

WKRP in Cincinnati: “Turkeys Away”

Happy Thanksgiving. We hope you all had a great day despite everything that is going on. When it comes to Thanksgiving-themed TV episodes, there is one that stands out from all the rest. That episode is Turkeys Away from the first season of WKRP in Cincinnati in 1978.

WKRP General Manager, Arthur “Big Guy” Carlson, decides to do a Thanksgiving promotion that involves dropping 40 live turkeys from a helicopter over a shopping center. As you can imagine, it doesn’t go well and it is being covered live on the air by reporter Les Nessman. At the end of the show, Mr. Carlson covered in feathers says “As God as my witness, I thought turkeys could fly.” That may be the best remembered line from the entire show’s history.

The episode was inspired by a real-life event. Show creator Hugh Wilson was working at a top 40 radio station in Atlanta when he was told about a similar promotion that involved throwing live turkeys out of the back of a pickup truck. That proved messy as well!

Film, Generations

31 days of Gen X horror 2020 wrap up

Thanks to everyone who took part in our month-long salute to horror of the Gen X era. We will be back next year with an even bigger #31daysofgenxhorror.

When it comes to scary movies, the Gen X era is as important as the Universal horror movies of the 1930s. The biggest names in horror: Dracula, Frankenstein, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the Wolfman, and The Mummy were all introduced to the mainstream audience on a grand scale via those classic movies from Universal.

They stayed the dominant stars of horror until the Gen X era came around and new folks joined the group. Michael Myers, Jason Vorhees, and Freddie Kruger are A-listers when it comes to movie monsters. The era also produced Pinhead, Chucky, and Candyman.

The creatures of the thirties lived on in the monster mashup movies of the forties and remade in the fifties and sixties with a British twist in the Hammer horror films. Our generation’s monsters were in sequels well into the nineties and early 2000s. They also rose again in remakes and reboots.

The classic monsters never really went away, as movies are still being made about them and neither will the ones of our generation. The makeup and special effects will just keep getting better. Nothing will be able to kill them off, not silver bullets or a stake in the heart!

Generations, Music

Eddie Van Halen

The world lost Eddie Van Halen this week. Generation X lost one of the main creators of its soundtrack. The guitar hero passed away on Tuesday at the age of 65 to what his son Wolfgang called “his long and arduous battle with cancer”

First wave Gen X rock fans first learned about Eddie via the release of Van Halen’s first album in 1978. The record introduced the world to his amazing guitar playing and his signature and often imitated two-handed tapping technique. The self-titled album which still sounds fresh and un-dated went on to sell 10 million copies and kicked off an almost two-decade run of platinum recordings.

The band quickly became the hottest new band in rock and was soon headlining their own tours. Eddie became well known to people outside of the rock world by way of his marriage to TV star and America’s sweetheart, Valerie Bertinelli. Mainstream superstardom came to the band with the release of 1982’s Diver Down which contained the hit cover of Roy Orbison’s Oh Pretty Woman.

By this time the band was America’s top rock act. They headlined the US Festival in 1983 and received over a million dollars for the performance. The band was our generation’s Led Zepplin. Eddie was our Jimi Hendrix. He also played the guitar solo on Beat It from the biggest selling album of the time, Michael Jackson’s Thriller.

Soon a slew of bands hit the airwaves that all sounded somewhat similar to Van Halen. Most of these bands had guitar players who performed the tapping technique. Eddie’s red, white and black striped guitar called the Frankenstrat was the most recognized musical instrument of our generation. When Eddie started playing a Kramer guitar, other rock stars followed his lead. In fact, Kramer became the #1 guitar manufacturer for a time in the eighties.

The band’s stardom went to another level with the release of 1984 which featured the #1 classic Jump. When David Lee Roth left the band in 1985 and Sammy Hagar took over lead vocals, the band continued right along with hit after hit. The streak lasted almost two decades with the last top forty hit coming in 1995 with I Can’t Stop Loving you. The band created hits for the entire Gen X era of the late seventies to the mid-nineties.

Eddie Van Halen was not a member of Generation X. He was born in 1955, so that would make him a late boomer or an early member of Generation Jones, however you wish to label it. Although not one of our generational tribe, he never the less made a huge impact on us. When the news of his death broke, so many people, especially Xers took to social media to share their grief and shock of his untimely death. Many wrote about how he was a part of their childhood and teen years.

He had a huge musical influence on our generation. The tone of his guitar was one of the defining sounds of our generation. He was the gold standard of playing guitar in our era and to many, he still is. His sound was timeless but at the same time represented our era and the two scenes in Back to the Future that feature the sound and style of his playing solidifies that point.

The music made by Edward Lodewijk Van Halen will live forever on classic rock radio, YouTube, and by tribute bands playing bars and festivals all over the world. It will also live forever when a kid picks up a guitar and attempts to learn a riff from Unchained or Ain’t Talkin’ bout Love.

Thank you Eddie for the great music, the memories and for being part of the soundtrack of our lives.

Film, TV

31 Days of Gen X Horror.

It’s October 1st, so that means it’s time to kick off #31daysofgenxhorror on our social media sites. All this month we will spotlight some of the best-known horror films and TV shows from the Gen X era. We will also introduce you to some obscure movies and programs that you might have missed out back when they first came out.

On day 1, we felt that we should start with the trailer for the film that set the tone for much of the genre that came out in our generation. That movie is John Carpenter’s 1978 masterpiece Halloween. Please follow us on our social media sites for more tributes to the great horror movies and shows of our generation. We would also love to find out what you consider the scariest films or programs that came out in the Gen X era.

Have a great Halloween month!

Generations, TV

Labor Day

Happy Labor Day and we hope you had a great holiday weekend. Labor Day became an official federal holiday in the United States in 1894. For many of the Gen X kids who grew up in the seventies and eighties, there are two distinct generational memories associated with the day.

We all remember watching The Jerry Lewis MDA Labor Day Telethon. The show aired with Lewis as host from 1966 to 2011. At its peak, it aired on 213 stations around the country. In many of those markets, it aired on the biggest station in town. Often the local TV News anchors would put on tuxedos and ball gowns and host the local segments. You would also see local citizens on the phone banks and the town’s big wigs present a large check to the host. You might hear or see your name on TV if you called in and made a donation.

In our day, the telethon would come on at 9 pm Sunday and air until around 6:30 pm on Labor Day. When that tote board would appear with the final tally, it would mark the end of summer for many of us. A majority of our kids and grandkids now start the school year in August, but back in our era, the first day of school usually was the Tuesday after Labor Day.

For the kids who ruled the hallways, the ones who found refuge from troubled home life, or the students who truly loved school, there was excited anticipation in the air on Labor Day Night. For the bullied, ignored, unpopular or the kids who just planned struggled, the night was filled with dread and June could not come fast enough. For others, it was a drag because you could not watch The Price is Right at 11 am anymore.

What are your favorite memories of the telethon or the holiday?

Film, Music

GREASE 2

Grease 2, the sequel to the 1978 blockbuster was released on this day, June 11, back in 1982. The opening of this film however took a back seat to another film released on the same day. A little film that you might have head about that was directed by Steven Spielberg called E.T.

E.T. went on to become the highest-grossing film of the decade and knocked off Star Wars as the all-time box office champ. Grease 2 made a small profit with 15 million at the box office against a 12 million dollar budget. The film also opened to mostly bad reviews.

Grease 2 found a bigger audience on pay cable stations like HBO, Showtime, and The Movie Channel. The film also found a Gen X audience who many were too young to really appreciate the first film when it came out in 1978. Another big impact on Gen X can be summed up in two words: Michelle Pfeiffer.

Many a young Gen Xer fell in love with Pfeiffer who was playing a female version of the John Travolta role in the first film. Her co-star Matthew Caulfield played the clean-cut cousin of Olivia Newton John’s Sandy. Pfeiffer had been in a few movies before Grease 2, but this was her first starring role. She made a bigger splash the following year with her role as Al Pachino’s girlfriend in Scarface. By the end of the decade, she was one of the most in-demand leading ladies in film.

Were you a fan of the movie? Did you have a favorite song or musical sequence from the film?

Music

Private Dancer

Private Dancer, the fifth studio album by Tina Turner was released on this day back in 1984. The record was a huge success and kicked off a resurgence in Turner’s career.

The album peaked at #3 on the album charts and went on to sell over twenty million copies. It contained the hit singles, Let’s Stay Together, Better Be Good to Me, Private Dancer, and her only #1 hit, What’s Love Got to Do with It.

Turner had been a solo artist since 1976 when she left her husband and duo partner, Ike Turner. Prior to the release of Private Dancer, she was playing mostly clubs and hotel ballrooms. The album’s success led to Turner going on an area tour that lasted from February to December of 1985.

A number of artists, who like Turner, became well known in the sixties made comebacks in the eighties. Acts like The Kinks, The Moody Blues, and The Monkees all had hits for the first time in years. No other comeback led to the level of Superstardom as Tina Turner’s did.

Film, Generations, TV

May the 4th be with you!

It’s May 4th and this is the day that we celebrate Star Wars. The original film released in 1977 is by far the most important film of our generation. From the first film and the two sequels, and for all the toys, t-shirts, lunch boxes, and posters we purchased, there was never another film franchise in the Gen X era that came close to it in terms of profit or influence.

Here’s how some of us first found out about a new movie called Star Wars that would be hitting theaters soon. This is the original TV spot that aired in 1977.

Film, Generations

The top 25 Gen X films.

These are the essential 25 Gen X films that we feel every member of our generation should watch at some point in their lives. The list is made up of films that are about us and not just the biggest hits that came out during our era. That’s why you don’t see a Star Wars, Rocky, or Indiana Jones movie on the list. Tell us what you think about our choices and let us know if you think we missed a film.

Reality Bites

The Breakfast Club

Farris Bueller’s Day Off

Fast Times at Ridgemont High

Risky Business

Pretty in Pink

16 Candles

The Karate Kid

Back to the Future

Heathers

Singles

Less Than Zero

Boyz n the Hood

Clerks

The Lost Boys

Weird Science

War Games

Red Dawn

Secret Admirer

Some Kind of Wonderful

Breakin

Better Off Dead

Foxes

Lucus

Music

The Joshua Tree

On this day in 1987, U2 released their album, The Joshua Tree. It was their biggest selling album of all time and went on to sell over 25 million copies. The record went to #1 in over twenty countries and was the fastest-selling album in British history.

The album contained several U2 classic hits. With or Without You and I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For, both went to #1 and are the band’s only hits that topped the singles chart in America. Where the Streets Have No Name was also a top forty hit and In God’s Country gets frequent airplay to this day on Classic Rock radio.

The Joshua Tree won the Grammy for Album of the Year and Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals. It is listed as one of the greatest albums of all time by many critics and was selected by The US Recording Registry for preservation as The Library of Congress deemed it culturally, and historically significant.

U2 were already major stars before the album was released, but it certainly took them to another level. If you were a fan of the album, what was your favorite song? Why also do you think this album made such an impact at the time that it was released in the late eighties?